SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2018, 7:00 P.M.

6:00 P.M. ...........Registration and Latke Bar (catered by Edwin Blumberg Catering)
7:00 P.M. ...........Community Havdalah
7:35–8:25 P.M. ..Session #1 Select one class to attend
8:35–9:25 P.M. ..Session #2 Select one class to attend
9:30 P.M. ...........Dessert Reception and Celebration (catered by Edwin Blumberg Catering)

Music performed by Cantor Cheri Weiss & San Diego Jewish Community Choir

$48 Tapestry pre-registration ($55 at the door)
$40 JCC Member
$18 Teacher/ Student

Registration at the door will be $55 per person. Pre-Registration closes Thursday, November 29, 2018 at noon. All classes will be filled on a first-come basis. Tapestry staff reserves the right to close or cancel a class depending on attendance. For more information, contact Rabbi Lenore Bohm at (858) 362-1327.


 

7:35–8:25 P.M. SESSION #1 SELECT ONE CLASS TO ATTEND

1A. A Russian Jewish Religious Renaissance • Janice Alper
When the Soviet Union collapsed and the people of Russia reclaimed their roots, a religious renaissance emerged throughout the country and synagogues, which had functioned sporadically, or had been abandoned, were reclaimed. Today along the Lower Volga region, spanning from Astrakhan to Moscow, there are thriving congregations with active day schools, youth groups, and kosher markets. In this illustrated talk, Janice Alper will recount her recent journey to the area and discuss her conversations with rabbis and congregants.

1B. Kristallnacht on Film: From Reportage to Reenactments,1938-1948 • Dr. Lawrence Baron
In the absence of firsthand footage of Kristallnacht, newsreels, documentaries, and feature films employed a range of approaches to depict it in the ensuing decade. This lecture traces the evolution of these cinematic images within chronological and national contexts. Clips from these initial portrayals of Kristallnacht will be screened.

1C. Lilith & the Primordial Hermaphrodite: Artifacts of Biblical Redaction & Rabbinic Assumptions • Rav Shai Cherry, PhD 
Feminists have embraced Lilith. The delicious irony is that misogynists created her! This multimedia lecture shows how the two contradictory creation stories invited resolutions, including Lilith and the primordial hermaphrodite, which the authors of our creation stories may have never intended. What else in our Torah may have produced unintended consequences as a result of Rabbinic assumptions about the Torah?

1D. Key to Meaningful Life Through Jewish Lenses • Dr. Ilana DeLaney
Modern science makes a very convincing case for the human system being “built” to last for “125 years” if we take care of our bodies, minds and spirits.” Examine the formula for a healthy and meaningful life through an interactive Jewish text study. Explore how Jewish tradition encourages eating and sleeping well, being more optimistic and having a life purpose as steps we can take for achieving a Chaim Tovim, a good life.

1E. How the Events of Chanukah Lead to the Radical Reinvention of Judaism (Post-Temple Destruction) • Rabbi Devorah Marcus
Chanukah commemorates the rededication of the Second Temple in Jerusalem, yet despite its prominence in Jewish life, it stands out as the only holiday in the Jewish calendar that does not have a corresponding mishnaic tractate. How did the codifiers of the Talmud view Chanukah and the Hasmonean dynasty? In what ways did their radical reinterpretation of Judaism keep it alive for generations to come? What kind of “radical reinterpretations” of Judaism are we experiencing now, and what do we need to move forward with vigor as the 21st century unfolds?

1F. Angels and Jewish Tradition • Rabbi Leah Herz
Angels appear in the Tanach (Hebrew Bible) and throughout later Jewish literature. They are supernatural beings who are messengers of God. They can bring healing and information, and are generally represented as good and not subject to evil impulses. How did angels enter our Jewish “vocabulary” and in which biblical and later stories do they play important roles? How did Christianity and Islam build on our notion of angels and how do their notions differ from ours? There is a lot to learn about Angelology!

1G. Kitchens for Good • Aviva Paley
At this session you will hear from the Co-founder and participants of Kitchens for Good, a social enterprise that repurposes food that might otherwise go to waste, turns it into healthy meals for those in need, and trains those previously perceived as “unemployable” for careers in the culinary industry. Core to its values, Kitchens for Good believes that all food has power and all people have potential. Kitchens for Good is unique in that half of their revenue is generated through social enterprise catering, making them one of the most sustainable and innovative non-profits in San Diego. You will hear about how this innovative organization got started, as well as hear from graduates of their culinary apprenticeship program about how their lives have been transformed from homelessness, addiction, and incarceration to employment, stability, and a promising future.

1H. Death Café • Rabbi Alexis Pearce

Death Cafes provide a safe, agenda-free place to discuss death and dying. Not a grief support or therapy group, it is a gathering of interested people who would like to discuss death, dying and end-of-life. This “movement” began in 2004 and has grown to be popular in 23 countries, beginning with France and the UK. The official objective of a death cafe is to encourage people to make the most of their finite lives. Death Cafes have helped to relax the taboo of speaking about death. San Diego has hosted several Death Cafes, although none in a specifically Jewish context. Here is your chance to participate. Nothing morbid, laughter and goodwill guaranteed!

1I. Political Flashpoints and the Future of Jewish Life on Campus • Michael Rabkin

Israel has been a flashpoint on many college campuses, but what does it really look like from the perspective of Jewish students and the professionals who work with them every day? What programs and initiatives have worked to stem the tide of BDS campaigns, and what is in store for the future of Jewish life on campus? A presentation and discussion will explore these themes and bring new insights to an often misunderstood landscape of campus political activism today.

1J. Gutman and Rubin: Israeli Art Pioneers for a Pioneer State • Guri Stark

Nachum Gutman and Reuven Rubin were Israeli artists who were pioneers of a new, distinctive “Eretz Yisrael” art style in the days prior to the founding of the State. They each developed a unique style that was influenced by their personal experiences of building a new life in the young state. They portrayed Israel’s landscapes and inhabitants in a sensitive fashion. We will review their paintings, mosaics, tapestries and books,discussing what motivated these artists, how they were influenced by the events around them and how they influenced the art world in Israel of the 1940s and 50s.

 

8:35–9:25 P.M. SESSION #2 SELECT ONE CLASS TO ATTEND

2A. A Russian Jewish Religious Renaissance • Janice Alper
When the Soviet Union collapsed and the people of Russia reclaimed their roots, a religious renaissance emerged throughout the country and synagogues, which had functioned sporadically, or had been abandoned, were reclaimed. Today along the Lower Volga region, spanning from Astrakhan to Moscow, there are thriving congregations with active day schools, youth groups, and kosher markets. In this illustrated talk, Janice Alper will recount her recent journey to the area and discuss her conversations with rabbis and congregants.

2B. Kristallnacht on Film: From Reportage to Reenactments, 1938-1948 • Dr. Lawrence Baron
In the absence of firsthand footage of Kristallnacht, newsreels, documentaries, and feature films employed a range of approaches to depict it in the ensuing decade. This lecture traces the evolution of these cinematic images within chronological and national contexts. Clips from these initial portrayals of Kristallnacht will be screened.

2C. Judaism & Darwinism • Rav Shai Cherry, PhD
What are Judaism’s historical attitudes toward science? Has it changed since Darwin? We know Southern Baptists reject Darwinism—why? (Over 40% of Americans reject Darwinian evolution!) Is Darwinism kosher, and what are the challenges and implications.

2D. Key to Meaningful Life Through Jewish Lenses • Dr. Ilana DeLaney
You might be surprised to hear how the deep influence of Jewish values and artists has shaped musical and popular culture from the 1930’s until today. Be prepared to tap your toes, sing along, and become inspired by the contributions of Am Yisrael!

2E. How the Events of Chanukah Lead to the Radical Reinvention of Judaism (Post-Temple Destruction) • Rabbi Devorah Marcus
Chanukah commemorates the rededication of the Second Temple in Jerusalem, yet despite its prominence in Jewish life, it stands out as the only holiday in the Jewish calendar that does not have a corresponding mishnaic tractate. How did the codifiers of the Talmud view Chanukah and the Hasmonean dynasty? In what ways did their radical reinterpretation of Judaism keep it alive for generations to come? What kind of “radical reinterpretations” of Judaism are we experiencing now, and what do we need to move forward with vigor as the 21st century unfolds?

2F. Angels and Jewish Tradition • Rabbi Leah Herz
Angels appear in the Tanach (Hebrew Bible) and throughout later Jewish literature. They are supernatural beings who are messengers of God. They can bring healing and information, and are generally represented as good and not subject to evil impulses. How did angels enter our Jewish “vocabulary” and in which biblical and later stories do they play important roles? How did Christianity and Islam build on our notion of angels and how do their notions differ from ours? There is a lot to learn about Angelology!

2G. The Kabbalah of Happiness • Rabbi Mendel Polichenko
To become a mensch is a singularly important process and goal in Jewish life. The ability to be joyous is considered by Chassidim as a biblical commandment! There is always a reason to be happy and to rejoice. How is that possible? In this presentation, you will discover the teachings and attitudes that foster a positive, embracing approach to life even in difficult and challenging times.

2H. Death Café • Rabbi Alexis Pearce
Death Cafes provide a safe, agenda-free place to discuss death and dying. Not a grief support or therapy group, it is a gathering of interested people who would like to discuss death, dying and end-of-life. This “movement” began in 2004 and has grown to be popular in 23 countries, beginning with France and the UK. The official objective of a death cafe is to encourage people to make the most of their finite lives. Death Cafes have helped to relax the taboo of speaking about death. San Diego has hosted several Death Cafes, although none in a specifically Jewish context. Here is your chance to participate. Nothing morbid, laughter and goodwill guaranteed!

2I. Political Flashpoints and the Future of Jewish Life on Campus • Michael Rabkin
Israel has been a flashpoint on many college campuses, but what does it really look like from the perspective of Jewish students and the professionals who work with them every day? What programs and initiatives have worked to stem the tide of BDS campaigns, and what is in store for the future of Jewish life on campus? A presentation and discussion will explore these themes and bring new insights to an often misunderstood landscape of campus political activism today.

2J. Gutman and Rubin: Israeli Art Pioneers for a Pioneer State • Guri Stark
Nachum Gutman and Reuven Rubin were Israeli artists who were pioneers of a new, distinctive “Eretz Yisrael” art style in the days prior to the founding of the State. They each developed a unique style that was influenced by their personal experiences of building a new life in the young state. They portrayed Israel’s landscapes and inhabitants in a sensitive fashion. We will review their paintings, mosaics, tapestries and books, discussing what motivated these artists, how they were influenced by the events around them and how they influenced the art world in Israel of the 1940s and 50s.