Coronado Lectures

2013-2014 Mandelbaum Family Lecture Series

ALL LECTURES ARE FREE
Coronado Library • 640 Orange Avenue • Coronado, CA 92118
More info: Ilene Tatro, 858.362.1154 or ilenet@lfjcc.com

[CLICK HERE FOR NORTH COUNTY LECTURE DATES]


Previous Lectures

Wednesday, October 23, 2013
BROKEN GLASS: ARTHUR MILLER, JEWISH NEW YORKERS, AND KRISTALLNACHT

Pat Launer, Emmy award-winning Theater Critic
Winn Room, Coronado Library @ 10:30 am

In one of his last plays, Broken Glass, Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Arthur Miller created the Gellburgs, a middle-aged New York Jewish couple. After Sylvia reads an article about Krystallnacht ("night of broken glass"), she suddenly becomes paralyzed from the waist down. Her affliction turns out to be as much about her marriage, her religion and the fading American Dream as about events in Nazi Germany.

Emmy Award-winning theater critic Pat Launer discusses the play, currently in production at North Coast Repertory Theatre (through 11/10), in the context of Miller’s life and work.


Wednesday, November 13, 2013
PACIFIC JEWS: EXPLORING 19TH CENTURY JEWISH LIFE IN CALIFORNIA

Dr. Joellyn Zollman Ph.D., Brandeis University
Winn Room, Coronado Library @ 10:30 am

In this talk we will look at the many reasons American Jews settled in the Golden State as we take a tour of California's Jewish past. The New York experience has long served as the template for understanding American Jewish history. Dr. Zollman will show us that there is much to be discovered when we start with a blank slate, and consider the impact that regional life and the history of the west has had on the Jewish experience in California.


Wednesday, December 18, 2013
THE HOLOCAUST AND CHURCHES IN NAZI GERMANY: EXAMPLES OF COMPLICITY AND RESISTANCE

Rev. Canon Jack E. Lindquist
Winn Room, Coronado Library @ 10:30 am

During the Third Reich (1933-1945) there was tremendous church support for National Socialism while at the same time there were few examples of a heroic minority who opposed it at the risk of death. This lecture will discuss the complicity of the Lutheran and Catholic churches and their leaders in the rise of Hitler and the Holocaust, and conversely the courageous few among the Christian clergy who resisted the Nazis.


Wednesday, January 8, 2014
LEONARD BERNSTEIN: FROM JEWISH ROOTS TO BROADWAY

Professor Steven Cassedy, UCSD
Winn Room, Coronado Library @ 10:30 am

Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990) was born in Lawrence, Massachusetts, to Jewish immigrants from Ukraine. Over his career, he established an international reputation as conductor, composer in many musical styles, and performer. He continually returned to his Jewish roots in his music. In such Broadway musicals as On the Town and West Side Story, he wrote some of the most memorable American show tunes of the twentieth century. This program will feature selections from those two shows (performed at the piano), in addition to other music by one of America’s most prodigious musical talents. It will place Bernstein in both the context of his Jewish roots and the context of American popular music.


Wednesday, February 5, 2014
LIFTING THE LAMP: THE HIDDEN JEWISH WOMEN BEHIND AMERICAN IDENTITY

Professor June Cummins, SDSU
Winn Room, Coronado Library @ 10:30 am

Many people know that the woman who wrote the poem on the Statue of Liberty, Emma Lazarus, was Jewish. But not everyone knows how much of being Jewish she put into that famous poem. Similarly, other well-known, widely circulated texts that are seen as essentially part of American culture were written by Jewish women. Come hear about the pivotal role Jewish women played behind the scenes in the promotion--and the creation--of American values and identities.


Wednesday, March 12, 2014
Can Democracy Take Hold in the Middle East?

Professor Sandy Lakoff, UCSD
Winn Room, Coronado Library @ 10:30 am

Natan Sharansky, the former Soviet refusenik, has argued that “all peoples desire to be free” and that the West must not betray its own values by turning its back on opponents of tyranny in the Middle East. Skeptics contend that apart from Israel and modern Turkey – both Western-influenced – the Middle East is rife with obstacles to democratization, including the influence of Islam, sectarian and ethnic hostilities, and poverty at one extreme and oil wealth at the other. The result, they say, is a Hobson’s choice between anarchy and civil war on the one hand and absolute monarchy and dictatorship on the other. This lecture will examine this debate and suggest what will be needed to overcome the obstacles.


Wednesday, April 2, 2014
THE JAZZ SINGER: FROM THE MELTING POT TO MULTICULTURAL AMERICA

Professor Lawrence Baron, SDSU
Winn Room, Coronado Library @ 10:30 am

Since it premiered in 1927, The Jazz Singer has been considered the paradigmatic film about the Americanization of the children of Jewish immigrants. The movie has inspired remakes on the theme of the son’s rebellion against his father’s traditions. This lecture examines how and why subsequent versions altered the original plotline and message to reflect changing configurations of ethnicity, race, and religion in the United States.

 


Joining the Coronado Friends of the CJC will assure the continuation of this lecture series.
For more information, please contact Ilene Tatro at ilenet@lfjcc.com or 858.362.1154.


Former program of the Agency for Jewish Education,
co-sponsored by the Jewish Federation of San Diego County.